Don’t Memorize! Instead Do this 1 THING to Improve TOEFL Speaking

MEMORIZE THE TEMPLATE NOT THE ANSWER

I’ve conducted thousands of TOEFL Speaking classes with non-native English speakers over the years. A percentage have a belief that memorizing answers will give them an edge in the TOEFL Speaking Section. It won’t. Here’s how to improve TOEFL speaking.

(Oh, btw, test your TOEFL IQ now!).

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4 Communication Strategies to Make You More Polite

BEING POLITE IS A GOOD THING

English teachers everywhere are constantly assessing students’ English abilities. For the soon-to-be-assessed, like those taking TOEFL Speaking classes, this can be a trying time spent anticipating common questions and often memorizing long stretches of language. For the assessors, short evaluations can be dull and even frustrating.

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For Nerds and Teachers ONLY: English Paragraph Structure

FOCUS ON THE PRODUCT NOT THE PROCESS

Korean freshmen are characterized by, among other things, a need for highly structured English language experiences. Particularly in TOEFL writing, students tend to be insufficiently educated about the structural and organizational features of an academic paragraph. The result is written work riddled with problems.

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3 Action Plans to Create a Better Learning Environment

CREATE A ROBUST LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

A lot of what TOEFL Teachers do involves planning. With varying degrees of thoroughness, in-field instructors are constantly creating schemes and means to smooth classroom interactions and facilitate learning outcomes. Good teacher-devised learning plans, whether at the program level or the lesson level, are predictive, responsive, and adaptive.

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Why Do We Have English-Only Classrooms?

Why Do We Have English-Only Classrooms?

It is safe to say that the EFL teaching community has accepted the communicative approach to task-based English language learning. Theoretically, teacher-fronted classes that had a focus on explicit grammar instruction have been replaced by student-centered activity-based classes that are characterized by greater learner-learner interaction, more negotiation of meaning, and inductive absorption of language rules.

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Why I Hate Accent Neutralization Courses

Why I Hate Accent Neutralization Courses

One of my colleagues was talking recently about an English language course designed for call center workers in India. The course calls for ‘accent neutralization’. I always roll my eyes when I hear of classes like this–sound more American!–where you get the ‘heck of a ballgame last night’-type of approach to small talk and a lot of ‘how y’all doin?’ choral drills.

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